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Sber Vice President Stanislav Kuznetsov announced a serious shortage of information security specialists.

There is almost no one to fight cybercriminals in Russia

“Our assessment is rather sad: about 5 thousand specialists work in the field of cybersecurity in the country. The need today is 20-fold”

That is, the deficit is estimated at 95,000 specialized specialists. It is noteworthy that Kuznetsov, back in December last year, called a different figure, declaring the absence of 20,000 people with the appropriate qualifications.

“We must boldly admit that we have a personnel disaster in the country in the area of ​​information security. 

According to our assessment, at least 20 thousand cybersecurity employees today is a shortage of personnel,”

I do not presume to judge the correctness of the calculations, but I agree with the general idea expressed by the head of Sberbank. Threats have increased manifold, and the solution of the issue requires significant funding and, most importantly, the emergence of a significant number of new teachers and mentors capable of cultivating information security specialists. And the substantive – political and economic – support of all specialists in the field of cybersecurity.

Over the past six months, pressure on Russian information systems from foreign hacker groups has sharply increased. In Estonia, the activities of the main think tank of the North Atlantic Alliance in the field of cyber warfare, the Tallinn Joint NATO Cyber Defense Center, are expanding.

The deteriorating economic situation in the country. At that time, this was directly related to the collapse of the Russian economy against the background of the all-Russian lockdown, due to which companies across the country began to close, including from the IT industry, which led to a massive reduction in staff.

At the last meeting of NATO foreign ministers, it was decided to create an international venture fund – an accelerator for the development of technology start-ups in the interests of the defense and security of the North Atlantic Alliance.

The project, by analogy with the American DARPA, was named DIANA: Defense Innovation Accelerator for the North Atlantic. It is reported that the amount of funding will be up to €1 billion. Central offices are expected to be located in Canada, the UK and Estonia.

Russia is not only under a record number of sanctions, but also in a state of “organized cyber warfare.” In this situation, the lack of information security specialists becomes an even more pressing problem

Estonia indicated that it plans to develop several technologies at once in the interests of NATO: artificial intelligence, robotics, cosmonautics, quantum computing, new materials, biotechnology (apparently, we do not know something about this proud Baltic country). Interestingly, cybersecurity is not mentioned directly, although it is in Tallinn that the NATO Joint Cyber ​​Defense Center has been located since 2008 (one of their highlighted projects is the Maidan “cyber hundred”).

Britain, on the other hand, was modestly satisfied with only one direction – “field tests” (operational testing), hinting that it would be she who would ultimately use the results.

In Russia, in the field of cyber threats, they still adhere to the defensive doctrine. I can hardly imagine that someone in us today openly declared support for Russian hackers who are disabling Ukrainian civilian infrastructure.

Meanwhile, in Ukraine, support for private initiatives to hack Russian computer networks and websites has become part of the state policy, which even the seemingly respectable Western press openly talks about with pleasure.

Russian IT specialists increasingly prefer to work for foreign companies. Increasing the number of IT teachers in universities is unlikely to solve this problem.

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Treadstone 71

@Treadstone71LLC Cyber intelligence, counterintelligence, Influence Operations, Cyber Operations, OSINT, Clandestine Cyber HUMINT, cyber intel and OSINT training and analysis, cyber psyops, strategic intelligence, Open-Source Intelligence collection, analytic writing, structured analytic techniques, Target Adversary Research, cyber counterintelligence, strategic intelligence analysis, estimative intelligence, forecasting intelligence, warning intelligence, threat intelligence
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By Treadstone 71

@Treadstone71LLC Cyber intelligence, counterintelligence, Influence Operations, Cyber Operations, OSINT, Clandestine Cyber HUMINT, cyber intel and OSINT training and analysis, cyber psyops, strategic intelligence, Open-Source Intelligence collection, analytic writing, structured analytic techniques, Target Adversary Research, cyber counterintelligence, strategic intelligence analysis, estimative intelligence, forecasting intelligence, warning intelligence, threat intelligence