Intelligence for the C-Suite and Stakeholders

This is a one-day course designed to educate corporate leadership and stakeholders in cyber and threat intelligence.  There is a general awareness of the need to establish intelligence functions. Many organizations do not have a fundamental understanding of what intelligence is, where the function should reside, how it is different from business and competitive intelligence while understanding the overlaps and natural points of integration. This one day course targets corporate leadership delivering a clear and coherent training that equips stakeholders with the understanding and tools they need to assist in building a successful intelligence program.


Registration Information – Dates and Times TBD

Course High-Level Outline

  • Using Strategic Intelligence
  • Organization and Focus of the Class
  • Background on Strategic Intelligence and Analysis
  • Approaches and Processes
  • Strategic Plan development, acceptance, and dissemination
    • Mission
    • Vision
    • Guiding Principles
    • Roles and Responsibilities
    • Threat Intelligence Perspective
    • Business Intelligence Perspective
    • Competitive Intelligence Perspective
    • Intelligence Strategic Challenges
    • Goals and Initiatives
    • Next Steps
    • Roadmap
  • Stakeholder checklist and stakeholder management groups with strategic and tactical activities definition for intelligence, description of needs and products. This will include:
  • The Future Use of Strategic Intelligence
  • Intelligence: Role, Definitions, and Concepts
  • Basic Concepts Concerning Intelligence
  • The Strategic Intelligence Process – Operations to Tactics
  • The Role of Strategic Intelligence and Its Impact on Stakeholders
    • Operational, Technical, Tactical
  • Why Stakeholders and Executives Need Strategic Analysis:
  • Strategic Analysis Leading to Strategic Decisions
  • Implementing Intelligence Programs
    • The Treadstone 71 Method (Experience with several program builds globally)
  • Challenges for Stakeholders to Accept Intelligence
  • Stakeholder Views: Impact on Intelligence
  • Intelligence as Catalyst for Stakeholders
  • Integrating Analytical Support and the Stakeholder Thought Process
  • Stakeholders and Self-Directed Strategic Processes, Procedures, Methods
  • The Role of Intelligence Management
  • Issues, Tactics, Techniques, Methods, and Principles
  • Managing Intelligence Projects
  • Providing Focused Leadership
    • Leading the Team
    • Understanding Issues and the Process
    • Analysis Overview
    • Collection Management
    • Production Management
      • Evaluation
      • Analysis
      • Integration
      • Interpretation
    • Types of Analysis
      • 14 Types of Analysis
    • Analytic Writing
      • ICD 203, 206, 208
      • Organization, Evidence, Argument, Sources, Pitfalls
      • Use the Title
      • Who/What, Why Now, So What, Impact so far, Outlook, Implications
      • BLUF and AIMS
      • Supervisory Actions
      • Summary Paragraphs
      • Alternative Analysis
      • Clarity and Brevity
      • Peer review
      • Reports and Reporting
        • Feedback
    • Pre-Mortem
    • Post-Mortem
    • Know your professor, get an A – Communicating Up
      • Relevance, Timeliness, Completeness, Accuracy, Usability
    • Briefing Rules
  • Intelligence Analysts and Self-Management
    • High-Level Tasks
  • Analyst Activities
    • Rules for developing analysts – Alignment and as collectors
    • The Role, Responsibilities, and Functions of the Analyst
    • The Analyst’s Roles and Responsibilities – RACI(s)
    • What the Analyst will face
    • Job Descriptions
  • Conclusion
    • The Executive / Stakeholder’s Roadmap
Corporate stakeholders risk investing large amounts of time and money with little positive effect their security, corporate strategies, and business direction. The C-Suite and Stakeholders participating in this course ensures their understanding of the discipline required to build a successful program. The course helps align information security, incident response, security operations, threat and cyber intelligence with the business.

2017 Training Courses – Treadstone 71

2017 Training Dates

Main Page to Treadstone 71 Training – 2017

(or on demand including in-house or by location)

Treadstone 71 is working with FS-ISAC for training in London, Singapore, Malaysia, and Australia.

FS-ISAC Sponsored Courses:

Cyber Intelligence Tradecraft Training
3-7 April | Reston, VA
More | Register
Cyber Intelligence Tradecraft Training
8-12 May | London
More | Register
Cyber Intelligence Tradecraft Training
19-23 June | Reston, VA
More | Register
Cyber Intelligence Tradecraft Training
21-25 August | Reston, VA
More | Register

Full Suite of Cyber-Threat Intelligence and Counterintelligence Courses Ready for Global Delivery

Treadstone 71 today announced a full suite of Cyber and Threat Intelligence and CounterIntelligence training courses. The courses drive the expansion of Treadstone 71’s accelerated, academically validated, intelligence training to global markets. Treadstone 71 delivers courses in California, Virginia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the Netherlands and is set to expand to the Middle East and Asia later this year. (www.planetreg.com/T71IntelTraining)

Treadstone 71 offers a compelling business model that delivers rapid cyber and threat intelligence strategic planning, program build, and targeted training in sectors such as financial services, government, healthcare, energy, and other critical infrastructure verticals. Treadstone 71’s format, curriculum, and instruction model are helping meet critical global demand for cyber and threat intelligence and analysis expertise. Treadstone 71 training provide graduates with an attractive pathway to compensation increases, career progression, and much-needed attention to intelligence. The organization has been teaching cyber intelligence at the Master’s level and commercially for seven years. New courses include a focus on campaign management, the use of Tor, Tails, I2P, and Maltego as well as covering persona development and management. Students create a series of identities, character development, and dimensions, storyline, plot synopsis, story drive and limit, story weaving, applicability, scope, tools to be used, methods of interaction with other identities, engaging secondary characters, refining targeting while developing a campaign to gain street credentials.

“Our courses provide academic instruction combined with real-world, hands-on collection, analysis, analytic writing, dissemination, and briefings that many liken to an apprenticeship,” said Jeff Bardin, Chief Intelligence Officer for Treadstone 71. “Our curriculum follows the teachings of Sherman Kent and Richards Heuer giving students the tools necessary to perform targeted collection, structured analysis while authoring reports modeled after intelligence community standards. We teach methods of cyber infiltration, information and influence operations, counterintelligence strategies, mission based counterintelligence, denial and deception, and counter-denial and deception.”

Treadstone 71 courses are validated and proven by intelligence professionals creating job-ready threat intelligence professionals for global organizations suffering a talent shortage. “Intelligence analysis as an inherently intellectual activity that requires knowledge, judgment, and a degree of intuition,” continued Bardin. “Treadstone 71’s intelligence, counterintelligence, and clandestine cyber HUMINT training and services help organizations transform information into intelligence pertinent to their organization.”

Analysis includes integrating, evaluating, and analyzing all available data — which is often fragmented and even contradictory — and preparing intelligence products. Despite all the attention focused on the operational (collection) side of intelligence, analysis is the core of the process to inform corporate stakeholders. Analysis as more than just describing what is happening and why; identifying a range of opportunities… Intelligence Analysis is the key to making sense of the data and finding opportunities to take action. Analysis expands beyond the technical focus of today providing organizations with core capabilities for business, competitive, cyber, and threat intelligence.

Treadstone 71’s Cyber Intelligence Tradecraft Certification is the gold standard in the industry today derived from both academia and from Treadstone 71’s experience in building cyber intelligence programs at Fortune 500 organizations worldwide.

Treadstone 71

888.714.0071 – osint@treadstone71.comhttp://www.planetreg.com/T71IntelTraining

We Are in a State of Cyber Cold War?

Wisdom begins with the definition of terms – Socrates

Many believe that we are not in some sort of state of cyber warfare. Many believe that it is only influence operations. These are the same people who are selling you security technologies and services to protect your environment. They believe calling our current state cyber war is hype. They fact that they believe this is demonstrated in their technologies that have double and triple downed on solutions that do not work. Solutions based solely on see, detect, and arrest. A paradigm proven over the past 20 years to be a paradigm of failure. The game of many a vendor (not all) is to generate revenue off your fear. A fear that can be remedied if we fix information security by first starting to fix information technology (see Cyber Security Predictions – Not Reality TV – Just Daytime Entertainment). One of the problems we have is standard taxonomy and glossary. Most do not have an understanding of the basics of intelligence and war. Most feel the need to apply physical characteristics to cyber actions in order for those actions to be taken as some sort of warfare. This is a major misnomer. My request here is for you to read the limited glossary items below. Once you have read these items, think of where we are today with respect to cyber security. If after reading and applying critical thinking to the terms and our current state of cyber security you do not believe we are in a state of cyber cold war, then provide some well thought out comments as to what state we are in fact in.

Information Operations (IO). The integrated employment of the core capabilities of electronic warfare, computer network operations, psychological operations, military deception, and operations security, in concert with specified supporting and related capabilities, to influence, disrupt, corrupt or usurp adversarial human and automated decision making while protecting our own. (JP 1-02)

           This includes five core capabilities incorporated into IO

  1. Electronic warfare is any action involving the use of the electromagnetic spectrum or directed energy to control the spectrum, attack of an enemy, or impede enemy assaults via the spectrum.
  2. Computer Network Operations (CNO)
    1. Comprised of computer network attack, computer network defense, and related computer network exploitation enabling operations (JP 1-02)
  3. Psychological operations
    1. Planned operations to convey selected information and indicators to foreign audiences to influence their emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and ultimately the behavior of foreign governments, organizations, groups, and individuals. The purpose of psychological operations is to induce or reinforce foreign attitudes and behavior favorable to the originator’s objectives. (JP 1-02 and JP 3-13.2)
  4. Military Deception
    1. Actions executed to deliberately mislead adversary military decision makers as to friendly military capabilities, intentions, and operations, thereby causing the adversary to take specific actions (or inactions) that will contribute to the accomplishment of the friendly mission. (JP 1-02)
    2. According to JP 3-13.4, Counterintelligence provides the following for MILDEC planners:
    3. Identification and analysis of adversary intelligence systems to determine the best deception conduits;
    4. Establishment and control of deception conduits within the adversary intelligence system, also known as offensive CI operations;
    5. Participation in counterdeception operations;
    6. Identification and analysis of the adversary’s intelligence system and its susceptibility to deception and surprise; and
    7. Feedback regarding adversary intelligence system responses to deception operations.
  5. Operations Security

*******

Treadstone71 2017 Cyber Intel Courses – http://www.planetreg.com/T71IntelTraining

*******

OPSEC is a five-step iterative process that assists an organization in identifying specific pieces of information requiring protection and employing measures to protect them.

  1. Identification of Critical information: Critical information is information about friendly intentions, capabilities and activities that allow an adversary to plan effectively to disrupt their operations. U.S. Army Regulation 530-1 has redefined Critical Information into four broad categories, using the acronym CALI- Capabilities, Activities, Limitations (including vulnerabilities), and Intentions.This step results in the creation of a Critical Information List (CIL). This allows the organization for focus resources on vital information, rather than attempting to protect all classified or sensitive unclassified information. Critical information may include, but is not limited to, military deployment schedules, internal organizational information, details of security measures, etc.
  2. Analysis of Threats: A Threat comes from an adversary – any individual or group that may attempt to disrupt or compromise a friendly activity. Threat is further divided into adversaries with intent and capability. The greater the combined intent and capability of the adversary, the greater the threat. This step uses multiple sources, such as intelligence activities, law enforcement, and open source information to identify likely adversaries to a planned operation and prioritize their degree of threat.
  3. Analysis of Vulnerabilities: Examining each aspect of the planned operation to identify OPSEC indicators that could reveal critical information and then comparing those indicators with the adversary’s intelligence collection capabilities identified in the previous action. Threat can be thought of as the strength of the adversaries, while vulnerability can be thought of as the weakness of friendly organizations.
  4. Assessment of Risk: First, planners analyze the vulnerabilities identified in the previous action and identify possible OPSEC measures for each vulnerability. Second, specific OPSEC measures are selected for execution based upon a risk assessment done by the commander and staff. Risk is calculated based on the probability of Critical Information release and the impact if such as release occurs. Probability is further subdivided into the level of threat and the level of vulnerability. The core premise of the subdivision is that the probability of compromise is greatest when the threat is very capable and dedicated, while friendly organizations are simultaneously exposed.
  5. Application of Appropriate OPSEC Measures: The command implements the OPSEC measures selected in the assessment of risk action or, in the case of planned future operations and activities, includes the measures in specific OPSEC plans. Countermeasures must be continually monitored to ensure that they continue to protect current information against relevant threats.The U.S. Army Regulation 530-1 refers to “Measures” as the overarching term, with categories of “Action Control” (controlling one’s own actions); “Countermeasures” (countering adversary intelligence collection); and “Counteranalysis” (creating difficulty for adversary analysts seeking to predict friendly intent) as tools to help an OPSEC professional protect Critical Information.

Offensive Cyber Operations. Programs and activities that through the use of cyberspace, 1) actively gather information from computers, information systems or networks or 20 manipulate, disrupt, deny, degrade, or destroy targeted adversary computers, information systems, or networks. (NSPD-38)

Cold War – a state of political hostility between countries characterized by threats, propaganda, and other measures short of open warfare – a conflict or dispute between two groups that does not involve actual fighting.

2017-01-16_18-37-11.jpg

Cyber War – the use of computer technology to disrupt the activities of a state or organization, especially the deliberate attacking of information systems for strategic or military purposes. Cyber warfare involves the actions by a nation-state or international organization to attack and attempt to damage another nation’s computers or information networks through, for example, computer viruses or denial-of-service attacks.

Try this link for more definitions https://ccdcoe.org/cyber-definitions.html

To repeat. think of where we are today with respect to cyber security. Apply critical thinking to the terms and our current state of cyber security. Assess our relationship with Russia. Provide some well thought out comments as to what state we are in fact in if you believe we are not in a state of cyber cold war with Russia. If we are not, then how would you define our current state?

Treadstone 71

 

 

 

The 12 Days of Cyber Christmas

…or What I want for Cyber Security and Intelligence Christmas 2016

  1. All CIOs must have served as a CISO for at least 4 years before being allowed to be a CIO.
  2. All CIOs must have a CISSP, CISM, and at least 2 technical information security certifications and have been thoroughly trained and qualified to be a CIO. No more cronyism.
  3. CISOs will never report to the CIO – conflict of interest and a recipe for … what we have now.
  4. If you are the administrator for a device, you secure that device (servers, routers, appliances, etc.). You are responsible and accountable – Secure what you own. Secure what you manage.
  5. CIOs and their leadership will be held liable for deploying vulnerable systems.
  6. All new products (IoT and beyond) must be certified secure before public release. No more figure it out as we go and bolt it on after we have consumers hooked.
  7. All root access / administrative rights for production, critical, supporting, etc., systems and devices are removed and granted only for approved changes and incidents.
  8. All written code and script must be written properly. There is no such thing as secure code, only code the works correctly and does not create vulnerabilities.

Treadstone 71 2017 Intelligence Training Courses – Sign up now or inquire about how to have us come onto your site to training.

    9. All operating systems will be shipped closed and installed closed with a risk rating system for each port, protocol, and/or service. Each modification reduces the security posture of the operating system providing a risk score while automatically offering advice on how to remediate that score with other controls. 

    10. New regulations to enforce security and privacy, demanding disclosure of breaches,    fining companies and individuals for negligence are put in place, at once.

    11. Vendors posting adversary IoCs, TTPs, and other methods that would normally be seen as ‘telling the enemy what we know, i.e., sedition’ will be fined for such activity.

  12. You will tell yourselves over and over again that contracting with Treadstone 71 to build your cyber intelligence strategy and program is the absolute right thing to do (repeat after me …).

Merry Cyber Christmas from Treadstone 71

img_0668

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: