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Russia receives ammunition and military equipment from Iraq for military operations in Ukraine with the help of Iranian arms smuggling networks.

The use of the arms-trafficking underworld will signal a dramatic shift in Russian strategy as Moscow is forced to lean on Iran, its military ally in Syria, following fresh sanctions triggered by the Ukraine invasion.

RPGs and anti-tank missiles, as well as Brazilian-made multiple launch rocket systems, were sent to Russia from Iraq. According to the source, the Tehran authorities also presented Moscow with an Iranian-made Bavar 373 missile system similar to the Russian S-300.

Russia receives ammunition and military equipment from Iraq for military operations in Ukraine with the help of Iranian arms smuggling networks.

RPGs and anti-tank missiles, as well as Brazilian-designed multiple launch rocket systems, were sent to Russia from Iraq after Moscow’s unsuccessful campaign in Ukraine in March.

An Iranian-made Bavar 373 missile system similar to the Russian S-300 was also donated to Moscow by the Tehran authorities, who also returned the S-300, according to a source who helped arrange the transport.

The use of the arms-trafficking underworld would signal a dramatic shift in Russian strategy as Moscow is forced to lean on Iran, its military ally in Syria, following new sanctions triggered by the Ukraine invasion.

Iraq has hosted US and Western troops since the ouster of Saddam Hussein in 2003, and the US has trained and supplied various units of the Iraqi army and special forces to defend the Baghdad government from insurgents. After two decades of war, the country is flooded with weapons.

Most of it legally passed into the hands of Iranian-backed Shiite groups that oppose the US presence in the country, but since 2016 have been officially included in the Iraqi armed forces as part of the fight against the Islamic State.

RPGs and anti-tank missiles in the possession of Hashd al-Shaabi, the most powerful Shiite group, were flown to Iran through the Salamja border crossing on March 26, where they were received by the Iranian military and transported to Russia by sea, said the commander of the group that controls the crossing. .

On April 1, Hashd al-Shaabi also dismantled and shipped to Iran two Brazilian-designed Astros II rocket launchers, known in Iraq as a licensed version of the Sajil-60, the source said.

“We don’t care where the heavy weapons go (because we don’t need them at the moment,” ed.). Anything that is directed against the US makes us happy,” one of the Hashd al-Shaabi sources said.

After that, three cargo ships capable of carrying such cargo – two under the Russian flag and one under the Iranian flag – crossed the Caspian Sea from the Iranian port of Bandar Anzeli to Astrakhan.

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Treadstone 71

@Treadstone71LLC Cyber intelligence, counterintelligence, Influence Operations, Cyber Operations, OSINT, Clandestine Cyber HUMINT, cyber intel and OSINT training and analysis, cyber psyops, strategic intelligence, Open-Source Intelligence collection, analytic writing, structured analytic techniques, Target Adversary Research, cyber counterintelligence, strategic intelligence analysis, estimative intelligence, forecasting intelligence, warning intelligence, threat intelligence
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